07.26.10 Client News

Recycled aluminum now standard on all of Wausau’s window and curtainwall framing

Supporting the U.S. Green Building Council LEED(R) Rating System(TM) criteria for recycled content, Wausau Window and Wall Systems now fabricates all of its products using aluminum extrusions exclusively from secondary billet that contain at least 70% total recycled content. These products continue to be backed by the company’s long-standing warranty of up to 10 years.

“From framing that uses thermal barriers and recycled aluminum content, to glass that allows for low thermal transmittance and glare-free daylighting, to smooth-operating hardware that promotes natural ventilation, to the eco-friendly finishes that contribute to a low-maintenance, long lifecycle — our products are manufactured to meet the green design and construction goals of today’s commercial building needs,” says Wausau’s president, Rick Marshall.

He continues, “While recycled content requirements are described clearly in the most recent edition of LEED for New Construction and Major Renovation (LEED-NC), the calculations can be complex. Under LEED, the recycled content value of a manufactured assembly is determined by weight. This becomes important when determining the recycled content of window and curtainwall systems, versus individual components such as framing or glass.”

In LEED-NC, Version 3, Materials and Resources (MR) Credits 4.1 and 4.2 require separate reporting for pre-consumer and post-consumer recycled content. These are used to calculate “combined” recycled content, equal to post-consumer plus one-half of pre-consumer recycled content. Depending upon the customer specification and extrusion source, Wausau’s recycled aluminum extrusions have a LEED combined content of 42-69%, with total recycled content of 70-83%.

Wausau provides easy-to-use templates, available on every project, detailing recycled content of components and assemblies by weight. To download comprehensive details, specifications and product performance information for Wausau’s products, please visit http://www.WausauWindow.com.

Wausau also welcomes visitors to its LEED-Silver manufacturing center. Further demonstrating its commitment to energy-efficiency and environmental leadership, Wausau’s facility is constructed with the same high-performance systems that it provides to customers.

Wausau will be exhibiting its products at the USGBC’s Greenbuild 2010 in booth #L208.

A PDF of this announcement can be downloaded here.
A high-resolution photo can be downloaded here. Additional images are available.

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07.13.10 Client News

Two new AIA/CES programs address integrated façade design

“Daylighting and Integrated Façade Design” and “Understanding U-Factors” are two new, educational presentations available through the American Institute of Architects’ Continuing Education System (AIA/CES). Each of the courses are offered as one-hour, in-person presentations to architects through several providers: Harmon, Inc.; Tubelite Inc.; Viracon, Inc.; and Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

The AIA/CES courses’ integrated façade design recommendations, project examples and training draw on the technical expertise of all of these companies. Together, they offer the design community balanced and competitive solutions to meet the energy challenges of today’s commercial and institutional buildings.

1999 K St., D.C., photo by RainerViertlböck

1999 K St., D.C., photo by RainerViertlböck

Those who attend and successfully complete the “Daylighting and Integrated Façade Design” course will learn how to:
* Identify the key variables, components, and benefits of integrated façade design
* Analyze glazing by “daylight” types
* Discover how integrated façade design can create successful daylighting with greater than 30% window-to-wall ratio using performance-based design
* Describe appropriate window size and configuration for use with sun shades and light shelves

Those attending the “Understanding U-Factors” course will be instructed in:
* Identifying five attributes affecting window U-Factor
* Employing at least three design options to improve window U-Factor
* Differentiating between National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) and American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) testing and certification processes
* Drafting non-defective specification requirements for U-Factor
* Recognizing other important, energy-related window design factors

Participants receive 1.0 Learning Unit (LU) for Health/Safety/Welfare and Sustainable Design (1.0 LU/HSW/SD) for each program. AIA-registered architects are required to earn a total of 18 LUs per calendar year to maintain their AIA membership. Of these, eight must be in Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW) subjects. Sustainable Design (SD) is a subset of HSW. Four of the eight HSW LUs must meet the established SD guidelines for mandatory continuing education.

To request a presentation or other educational information, please contact:
* Harmon, one of the largest U.S. full-service building glass installation, maintenance and renovation companies, at 877-525-9566, info@harmoninc.com
* Tubelite, a leading manufacturer of architectural, extruded aluminum products with high recycled-content, at 800-866-2227, dependable@tubeliteinc.com
* Viracon, the leading fabricator of coated, high-performance architectural glass for global markets, at 800-533-2080, glass@viracon.com
* Wausau Window and Wall Systems, an industry leader in engineering window and curtainwall systems, at 877-678-2983, info@wausauwindow.com

Harmon, Inc.; Tubelite Inc.; Viracon, Inc.; and Wausau Window and Wall Systems, Inc. are part of Apogee Enterprises, Inc., a publicly held, U.S. corporation.
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07.05.10 Client News

University of Illinois Business Instructional Facility responds to students, achieves LEED Platinum certification

Balancing functionality, aesthetics and green goals, the Business Instructional Facility at the University of Illinois College of Business not only meets students’ needs for classroom, group collaboration, study and gathering space, it also incorporates industry-leading sustainability measures that students lobbied for at the outset of the building’s design. The University’s eye to the environment earned it the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Platinum certification – the first awarded to a College of Business at a public university and only the 15th such certification in the state of Illinois.

College of Business at Illinois

College of Business at Illinois

“It was no mistake the College of Business took action to build the first ‘green’ building on our campus,” said Larry DeBrock, the dean of the College of Business. “The LEED Platinum designation reflects the importance of social and professional responsibility to our students, staff, faculty, friends and alumni. We are proud of our continuing efforts to push the college and the campus to be leaders in a sustainable world for everyone.”

The Business Instructional Facility houses state-of-the-art classrooms, offices and a 300-seat auditorium, and, as the building’s centerpiece, a natural-light-filled atrium, where students meet and study, and the University hosts special events. The $60 million building’s energy-saving features, reduce energy use by an estimated 50 percent and utility costs by up to $300,000 per year.
These include:
* Solar panels to help power the building
* Roof plantings to insulate the building and reduce water runoff
* Filtered, humidity-controlled, low-velocity air delivered at ambient temperatures to improve indoor air quality year-round
* Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ 7250 Series SuperWall and 8750 Series structural-glazed curtainwall to maximize natural light in the four-story atrium
* Triple-glazed, operable windows in the classrooms and offices

“Basic passive integrations of smart building, shaping, siting and carefully tuning conventional wall systems — especially the windows — by the design team contributed more toward the sustainability and LEED Platinum certification than any high-tech element,” says Craig Copeland, Senior Associate at Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, and the project’s design team leader. “The variety of glazing systems is a big contributor to the building’s overall quality and environmental intelligence. There was a great deal of consideration given not only to thermal efficiency, but also to daylighting and ventilation for enhancing the building’s learning environment.”

Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, founded by University of Illinois alumnus Cesar Pelli, designed the four-story building, which opened in August 2008, and PSA Dewberry was the architect of record. Atelier Ten counseled the project and design team on massing, daylighting, thermal zoning and mechanical system types. Construction was managed by Gilbane Building Company, which oversaw 14 different contractors on the project. Among these was glazing contractor Bacon & Van Buskirk, which installed more than 13,000 square feet of curtainwall and 400 offset windows provided by Wausau for the project.

“The program statement specified our need for high-performing windows that provided outside views and as much natural light as possible. The atrium curtainwall takes full advantage of the southern exposure and available daylighting,” says George Freeman, director of facilities, for the College of Business. “It has become the place for everyone to gather in part because of the openness and light. Everybody loves that space.”

College of Business at Illinois

College of Business at Illinois

The atrium displays nearly 12,000 square feet of Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ 8750 Series structural-glazed four-side curtainwall and 1,000 square feet of 7250 Series SuperWall. In the classroom and offices, the Business Instructional Facility has 477 high-performance 4250 Series offset windows, part of the Advantage by Wausau standard product offering. The windows’ setback glass and asymmetrical sash sizes provide a distinctive look. For exceptional energy efficiency, three-quarters of these operable windows feature triple-glazed, insulated glass by Viracon.

According to Copeland, less than 25 percent of the total building is glazed, which may be deceiving because of the amount of bright and well-controlled, day-lit spaces throughout. In the auditorium, for example, less than 10 percent of the room’s walls are glazed. Windows placed horizontally at eye-level give students and faculty views to the outside and the perception of abundant natural light on sun-filled days.

More than half of the windows include integral, between-glass blinds. The blinds were reversed, such that the slats were concave in the “up” position. This allowed the occupants to not only manage privacy and light, but to have greater control in redirecting sunlight by bouncing the light off the blinds’ concave surface.

Demonstrating its commitment to durable, high-performance products, Wausau’s 4250 Series window units are NFRC-labeled and successfully tested to meet the AAMA AW-70 Performance Class rating. All of Wausau windows and curtainwall have aluminum frames, which can be specified with recycled content. For the University of Illinois College of Business, Wausau’s aluminum framing material was finished by Linetec in three-coat, 70 percent fluropolymer, Bone White paint for a consistent, long-lasting finish.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

06.21.10 Client News

LAPD building demonstrates environmental leadership and community connection, while meeting seismic requirements

Considered the most expensive building of its kind, the $437 million Los Angeles Police Administration Building also is among the greenest, thanks in part to Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

©Tim Griffith

©Tim Griffith

In May 2010, the building earned Gold certification under the LEED® Green Building Rating System™ for new construction. The LAPD Headquarters project also was recognized in 2009 with the American Institute of Architects’ presidential honor award for “Building Team of the Year” and in June 2010 with the “Q Award” from the Alliance for Quality Construction.

Opened in October 2009, the 10-story, 500,000-square-foot structure maximizes the advantages daylighting and energy-efficiency. Aiding in this effort, the building features high-performance glass, recycled/recyclable aluminum framing and ornamental details, and environmentally friendly, durable paints.

Contributing to the building’s intended longevity, the window and curtainwall systems also were tested to meet stringent performance criteria. Seismic performance was of particular concern as the previous police administration building, constructed 1955, and was not expected to withstand another moderate earthquake.

One block south of its prior location, the new facility sits on the lot formerly occupied by the Caltrans building. The new police headquarters’ modern glass-metal-concrete exterior blends with the neighboring architectural icons including the new Caltrans building, City Hall, the Los Angeles Times building and St. Vibiana’s Cathedral.

Los Angeles-based AECOM (formerly DMJM Design) designed the Los Angeles Police Administration Building in joint venture with Roth + Sheppard of Denver. Tutor-Saliba Corporation of Sylmar, Calif., served as the project’s general contractor throughout the three years of construction. According to Tutor-Saliba’s James Nies, Wausau’s participation in this challenging project included “implementing a value-engineered system that saved the City significant amount of money. Achieving this required thorough submittal coordination, as well as installation tolerances with the adjacent, pre-cast concrete wall system.”

Geometric shapes, highly transparent glass and windows were incorporated throughout the building’s exterior to invite natural light and sightlines that connect the city’s law enforcement with the community it serves. Light colors and finishes are used to further communicate this sense of warmth and openness.

Many watching the project’s progress noted the visible transformation from structural framework to physical building began last summer as the first glass lites were installed. Specialty glazing contractor Metz Enterprises, Inc. of Anaheim, Calif., carefully and quickly installed the large windows and curtainwall units supplied by its manufacturer of choice, Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

Helping save time and labor in the field, the majority of the 100,000-square-feet of windows and curtainwall systems were shop-glazed and pre-assembled into ready-to-install units, then staged, sequenced, crated and shipped to the job site. To ensure proper performance protected by an up to 10-year warranty, these units were factory-glazed in Wausau’s climate-controlled, LEED-Silver certified manufacturing facility.

“Performance is critical,” emphasizes Wausau’s senior project manager, Kurt Beidle, who was involved from the earliest stages of the Los Angeles Police Administration Building’s development. “The project was tested for air, water, structural, floor displacement and seismic movement with repeated air and water tests between each requirement. This included both static and dynamic water tests on the windows, and on the unitized curtainwall. A full, two-story mock-up of the curtainwall, including the pre-cast, was assembled to match the descriptions and conditions, and successfully tested.”

Beidle also notes, “The unitized curtainwall had a simulated acid etch, as well as two different dot patterns. Viracon provided VRE1-67 and VE1-2M high-performance, insulated glass. The glass was silk-screened with a custom dot pattern that varied by elevation. Some locations had white dots; some black dots. It depended on the solar and optical needs of its placement on the building.”

Along with the custom silk-screened glass, the curtainwalls’ deep sightlines and shadow boxes add visual interest to the façade. Similarly, the window pattern avoids a grid-like layout in favor of an open, yet secure, staggered arrangement. For these 429 ‘punched’ openings, Wausau supplied factory-glazed, custom windows. “These were specifically designed for this project with a very thin metal profile along the side of the pre-cast opening. Each opening consisted of a pre-glazed, two-section window with the upper portion of the window in front of a pre-cast panel to accommodate quick, safe installation from the building’s interior,” explains Beidle.

For the street-level installation, Wausau fabricated a custom, butt-glazed, knocked-down wall system to enclose the café and auditorium. Beidle adds. “We also supplied the aluminum canopies for the entrances, as well as the decorative trim at the roof coping, and the vertical ‘knife point’ of the building. We also worked closely with the architectural staff to design custom interior trim, as well as custom exterior caps for the aesthetic look they were seeking.”

Supporting the project’s architectural goals for appearance and performance, the aluminum framing and components were painted by Linetec in a three-coat, Champagne Gold II metallic Duranar® coating, which meets or exceeds all criteria of the AAMA 2605 specification. “These are the most weather-resistant of all finishes,” says Jon Close, Linetec’s vice president of sales and marketing. “The three-coat process includes primer, topcoat and clear finish. This combination provides outstanding resistance to humidity, color change, chalk, gloss shift and chemical cleaning.”

Linetec’s environmentally responsible, liquid paint application also supports many projects’ green building goals. During the finishing process, Linetec captures and destroys the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) present in solvent-borne paints.

©Tim Griffith

©Tim Griffith

Within its finished interior, the Los Angeles Police Administration Building has dedicated spaces for administration and investigative operations, a Police Commission hearing room, conference center, state-of-the-art communications and command center, 200-seat café, and a 450-seat auditorium. Many of the building’s large assembly areas are used for civic and community functions as are its outdoor plazas and gardens.

The building was turned over to the owner, City of Los Angeles’ Department of Public Works, on time and under budget in September 2009. Eager to relocate, the 2,300 law enforcement officers and employees immediately began moving into the much-needed space and comfort of their new home.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

06.18.10 Client News

Saint Elizabeths’ new, mental health care facility designed with daylight, green spaces; replaces 155-year-old institution

In April, Saint Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D.C., welcomed patients and staff into a new, mental health care facility. Established in 1852, Saint Elizabeths was the first large-scale, federally-run hospital for people with mental illness. The move completes a transition from the historic, psychiatric institution into a modern, healing environment.

Designed by Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Architecture & Engineering, the new hospital is centered on recovery-based mental health treatment and the highest quality, patient care. The facility’s design incorporates numerous sustainable design elements such as a 28,000-square-foot green roof, the strategic use of garden spaces and natural light.

Contributing to these green goals, the building’s operation, the occupants’ outlook and the patients’ safety, Wausau Window and Wall Systems provided Saint Elizabeths’ new facility with 373 project-in, psychiatric-grade window units. Glazing contractor Clyde McHenry, Inc., worked closely with Wausau and with general contractor Tompkins Builders, Inc. to ensure all criteria were met.

Under the guidance of Gilbane Building Company, Tompkins Builders began construction in 2006 on the $140 million, 450,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility. In 2008, Clyde McHenry installed the psychiatric-grade windows throughout the building. “It was a massive project, but our portion went well. We do windows and we’ve done several jobs with Tompkins before this,” says Fred Peters, Clyde McHenry’s director of sales and project manager. “We got with Wausau and worked it out. We’d exchange the drawings, make sure we met the specs, then submitted it to the architect for approval.”

Helping earn this approval, Wausau’s time-tested psychiatric windows were furnished with interior polycarbonate glazing, human impact resistant to prevent unauthorized egress or passage of contraband. The design employed has been in successful use for more than 20 years, on scores of institutions nationwide. “If a patient strikes or throws an object against the window, energy must be transferred sequentially through hardware, window frames, anchorage and substrates,” explains Lisa May, Wausau’s health care market manager.

The windows units’ aluminum framing offer a durable, low-maintenance, Dark Bronze anodize, as finished by Linetec. Also helping minimize maintenance, Wausau’s 3250-DT Series windows were specified with 5/8-inch, between-glass blinds. The integral blinds reduce the potential dangers of exposed cords and slats. Concealed hinges and tamper-resistant locks secure the opening during normal operating conditions. In the event of an emergency, the operable windows allow rescue personnel to enter the building or to open a series of units for rapid fresh air circulation.

“While patient safety remains a primary consideration in psychiatric applications, facilities like Saint Elizabeths are creating a more home-like atmosphere with natural light and unrestricted views to the outside,” adds May.

Saint Elizabeths Hospital provides intensive, in-patient care for individuals with serious and persistent mental illness who need the security and structure to assist in their recovery. Saint Elizabeths also provides mental health evaluations and care to patients committed by the courts. The Hospital is part of the D.C. Department of Mental Health (DMH), which serves 17,000 adults, children and youth each year.

Saint Elizabeths Hospital’s original, 155-year old facility is located east of the Anacostia River. Its historic buildings date back to 1855 when it opened as the Government Hospital for the Insane. During the Civil War, the facility was converted temporarily into a hospital for wounded soldiers. In 1916, its name was officially changed to Saint Elizabeths. In 1991, the National Trust for Historic Preservation declared the site a National Historic Landmark. In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security broke ground on this notable campus to construct its consolidated headquarters.

The first of many structures erected on the campus was the Center Building, designed by Thomas U. Walter, architect of the Capitol. The building’s floor plan is one of the nation’s earliest relying on the therapeutic direction of Thomas S. Kirkbride, one of the founders of the American Psychiatric Association. Charles H. Nichols, the hospital’s first medical superintendent, enhanced Walter’s design and Kirkbride’s plan to emphasize patient observation, as well as ventilation and external views. These architectural characteristics remain essential elements of the new Saint Elizabeths Hospital.

Throughout its history, Saint Elizabeths is estimated to have served more than 125,000 patients. Well-known patients have included Ezra Pound and John Hinckley, Jr. Today, the new facility and its staff have the capacity to care for approximately 300 patients and to develop a personalized treatment plan helping each patient achieve the highest quality, mental health outcomes.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

06.17.10 Client News

Steve Seeling joins Tubelite as client development manager

Tubelite Inc. has hired Steve Seeling, CDT, as a client development manager representing the company’s architectural aluminum products. In this role, he assists commercial building teams in Nebraska, Kansas, western Missouri and Arkansas.

Seeling draws from three decades of experience in helping owners, designers and installers select windows, entrances, storefronts and curtainwall systems. Most recently, he worked at Traco as an architectural sales representative with a similar territory. Throughout his career, he has contributed to dozens of educational health care, hospitality and historically-significant projects in the region, including facilities at the University of Kansas, University of Missouri, and the University of Nebraska.

In addition to his new position with Tubelite, he also serves as an architectural sales representative for Wausau Window and Wall Systems. “Tubelite and Wausau’s products complement each other to offer customers a full range of performance choices for their building envelope,” says Seeling. “Working exclusively with these two companies, I’ll specialize in premium fenestration products; ones that add value through energy efficiency, distinguished style and dependability. When customers understand their options, they can make better-informed decisions to ensure the correct product for their application.”

As an example, Seeling notes that Tubelite and Wausau’s products contribute to customers’ green goals such as the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Rating System™. All of Tubelite’s storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylight control systems are manufactured using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition featuring environmentally-friendly finishes. Many products also are available with high thermal performance to support buildings’ energy-efficient operations. “Along with the right products, Tubelite and Wausau provide educational programs to help architects increase their knowledge of the total, integrated façade,” says Seeling.

A graduate of Missouri Valley College in Marshall, Mo., Seeling earned a bachelor’s degree in economics. He continues his professional development with industry associations such as Construction Specifications Institute, through which he successfully completed the Construction Documents Technology (CDT) program.
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06.08.10 Client News

Auraria Science Building blends beauty, technology to achieve LEED-Gold

Science and beauty don’t often intersect, but when they do, the results can be stunning, or joyous, or artful: all of which have been used to describe the recently opened Auraria Science Building. Contributing to the structure’s praise-worthy façade design, glazing contractor J.R. Butler and Wausau Window and Wall Systems supported the building’s energy-efficient performance and Gold-level requirements of the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Green Rating System™.

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

The newest addition to Denver’s Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), the $120 million Auraria Science Building opened in September 2009 as a premiere teaching facility for students from the Community College of Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver and the University of Colorado Denver. The existing Science Building was built in the early 1970s and is being renovated for an anticipated re-opening this autumn. Since the ’70s when the original science building opened, the Auraria Campus has grown 250%. The renovated structure will be united with the newly-constructed building to accommodate students in all three institutions and multiple programs.

Positioned at the campus’ main entrance, the east side of the new, four-story, 197,000-square-foot Science Building faces one of the busiest roads leading in and out of downtown Denver. Rather than shut the public out, the building’s floor-to-ceiling windows invite passers-by to peek inside. The views provided by the glass façade are intentional. In addition to serving as a highly rated educational facility, campus administrators also wanted the building to serve as a gateway, physically and visually connecting the Auraria campus to the greater Denver community.

In an interview with the Denver Post, the Science Building’s principal architect, David Pfeifer of AndersonMasonDale, said transparency was an important to the building’s design and function: “It is unmistakable that high-tech science education and research is occurring in the heart of the city.”

Views and light play an important part in setting the building’s transparent look and feel. From the east, those walking and driving by see into the building’s interior with walls painted in vivid shades of oranges, greens and blues. The building’s exposed vents, pipes and ductwork enhance its modern feel. Those inside the building enjoy abundant natural light, maximized by soffits that pull the interior walls away from the window system.

On the other sides of the building’s unique “7”-shaped design, the generous use of glass offer students and staff an unobstructed view of green spaces and other campus buildings. A shared lobby, hallways and other public access points connect the new building to the campus’ older, three-story science building.

Auraria - Sincere/Duncan Studios

Auraria - Sincere/Duncan Studios

Working with general contractor Haselden | Barton Malow, glazing contractor J.R. Butler selected Wausau as its supplier for the high-performance curtainwall and window systems. “Wausau was able to provide a complete package with its SuperWall for the new building and storefront and ribbon wall for the renovation project. The new construction portion used approximately 45,000 square feet of Wausau’s systems and Viracon’s glass,” says Marc Butler, president of J.R. Butler.  “We also used Lean manufacturing and scheduling, which turned out to be an important aspect in meeting the general contractor’s schedule.”

He explains, “Material management and installation requires careful coordination, especially when working in the field during the dead of winter. We rely on a just-in-time delivery to keep pace with the quick construction schedules. When schedules change, it can be difficult to make adjustments.”

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

Working with the Lean principals and tools, with which both Wausau and Viracon are familiar, J.R. Butler was able to shift its attention from the building’s south elevation to the north elevation. “This meant that we could close-in the building’s northwest exposure, protecting it from the majority of winter storms. The general contractor was thrilled that we could accommodate their request and stick to the same, overall timeframe.”

Kevin Robbins, Wausau’s regional sales manager, was confident that Wausau’s products could exceed the project’s rigorous specifications, as well as meet J.R. Butler’s fast-paced schedule. “Thanks to the efficiencies of our Advantage by Wausau offering, we were able to provide the SuperWall system in just three weeks,” says Robbins. “In the past, a system like this could easily take eight to 10 weeks. Cutting the lead-time that dramatically opens up all kinds of opportunities. For Butler, this allowed their glazing team to unitize the system in their shop and quickly install the pre-assembled units on site.”

In addition to meeting the project’s construction timeline and aesthetic needs, Wausau’s SuperWall system’s high-performance glazing and thermal barrier framing systems contribute toward energy efficiency. Wausau’s 7250 Series system was specified with Viracon‘s VNE 1-63, neutral low-e glass “Given the project’s green goals, this was an important factor in the Science Building’s material selection,” notes Robbins.

The insulating, thermal barrier system was applied by Linetec, as was the aluminum framing’s finish. “The architect choose a custom, Extra Dark Bronze anodize, which is a hard finish to match,” says Butler. “Because Linetec finished all of the SuperWall, storefront and ribbon wall systems, we knew that we’d have a consistent look from one framing member to the next, and across both the new and renovated buildings.”

Linetec’s eco-friendly anodize also contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Using low-VOC paints and materials, assisted in achieving the LEED criteria. Some of Auraria Science Building’s other LEED credit-worthy, features include:
* Manufacturing materials regionally, 20% of which were produced within 500 miles
* Diverting 75% of construction waste from landfills
* Maintaining good air-quality measures during construction
* Installing energy-saving, occupancy sensors for interior lighting

Technology is found throughout the building, which houses everything from a cadaver lab and research spaces to a student lounge and coffee bar. The Science Building’s lab rooms are equipped with state-of-the-art classroom technology including laptop projectors and lectern cabinets with cameras, built-in laptop connections, Internet ports and other features.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

Wausau will be exhibiting at AIA Expo2010 in booth #2553.