07.26.10 Client News

Recycled aluminum now standard on all of Wausau’s window and curtainwall framing

Supporting the U.S. Green Building Council LEED(R) Rating System(TM) criteria for recycled content, Wausau Window and Wall Systems now fabricates all of its products using aluminum extrusions exclusively from secondary billet that contain at least 70% total recycled content. These products continue to be backed by the company’s long-standing warranty of up to 10 years.

“From framing that uses thermal barriers and recycled aluminum content, to glass that allows for low thermal transmittance and glare-free daylighting, to smooth-operating hardware that promotes natural ventilation, to the eco-friendly finishes that contribute to a low-maintenance, long lifecycle — our products are manufactured to meet the green design and construction goals of today’s commercial building needs,” says Wausau’s president, Rick Marshall.

He continues, “While recycled content requirements are described clearly in the most recent edition of LEED for New Construction and Major Renovation (LEED-NC), the calculations can be complex. Under LEED, the recycled content value of a manufactured assembly is determined by weight. This becomes important when determining the recycled content of window and curtainwall systems, versus individual components such as framing or glass.”

In LEED-NC, Version 3, Materials and Resources (MR) Credits 4.1 and 4.2 require separate reporting for pre-consumer and post-consumer recycled content. These are used to calculate “combined” recycled content, equal to post-consumer plus one-half of pre-consumer recycled content. Depending upon the customer specification and extrusion source, Wausau’s recycled aluminum extrusions have a LEED combined content of 42-69%, with total recycled content of 70-83%.

Wausau provides easy-to-use templates, available on every project, detailing recycled content of components and assemblies by weight. To download comprehensive details, specifications and product performance information for Wausau’s products, please visit http://www.WausauWindow.com.

Wausau also welcomes visitors to its LEED-Silver manufacturing center. Further demonstrating its commitment to energy-efficiency and environmental leadership, Wausau’s facility is constructed with the same high-performance systems that it provides to customers.

Wausau will be exhibiting its products at the USGBC’s Greenbuild 2010 in booth #L208.

A PDF of this announcement can be downloaded here.
A high-resolution photo can be downloaded here. Additional images are available.

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07.14.10 Association News

AAMA Southeast Region Fall Meeting to Feature Wind Engineering Facility Tour

The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) Southeast Region Fall Meeting will be held August 5-6 in Orlando, and will begin with a tour of the University of Florida Wind Engineering Lab in Gainesville, Fla. Dr. Forrest Masters (University of South Florida) will provide demonstrations of the hurricane simulator, cyclic test chamber (AAMA 520), installation testing and shingle/tile impacts. Masters also will provide a presentation on the requirements for design pressure, as well as other new proposals that will be of interest to industry professionals.

Information on registration, accommodations, transportation and meeting materials is available at the Southeast Region Meeting web page. If there are any questions or trouble with the online registration process, please contact Kaydeen Laird, AAMA Senior Meetings Coordinator, at klaird@aamanet.org.

07.13.10 Client News

Two new AIA/CES programs address integrated façade design

“Daylighting and Integrated Façade Design” and “Understanding U-Factors” are two new, educational presentations available through the American Institute of Architects’ Continuing Education System (AIA/CES). Each of the courses are offered as one-hour, in-person presentations to architects through several providers: Harmon, Inc.; Tubelite Inc.; Viracon, Inc.; and Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

The AIA/CES courses’ integrated façade design recommendations, project examples and training draw on the technical expertise of all of these companies. Together, they offer the design community balanced and competitive solutions to meet the energy challenges of today’s commercial and institutional buildings.

1999 K St., D.C., photo by RainerViertlböck

1999 K St., D.C., photo by RainerViertlböck

Those who attend and successfully complete the “Daylighting and Integrated Façade Design” course will learn how to:
* Identify the key variables, components, and benefits of integrated façade design
* Analyze glazing by “daylight” types
* Discover how integrated façade design can create successful daylighting with greater than 30% window-to-wall ratio using performance-based design
* Describe appropriate window size and configuration for use with sun shades and light shelves

Those attending the “Understanding U-Factors” course will be instructed in:
* Identifying five attributes affecting window U-Factor
* Employing at least three design options to improve window U-Factor
* Differentiating between National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) and American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) testing and certification processes
* Drafting non-defective specification requirements for U-Factor
* Recognizing other important, energy-related window design factors

Participants receive 1.0 Learning Unit (LU) for Health/Safety/Welfare and Sustainable Design (1.0 LU/HSW/SD) for each program. AIA-registered architects are required to earn a total of 18 LUs per calendar year to maintain their AIA membership. Of these, eight must be in Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW) subjects. Sustainable Design (SD) is a subset of HSW. Four of the eight HSW LUs must meet the established SD guidelines for mandatory continuing education.

To request a presentation or other educational information, please contact:
* Harmon, one of the largest U.S. full-service building glass installation, maintenance and renovation companies, at 877-525-9566, info@harmoninc.com
* Tubelite, a leading manufacturer of architectural, extruded aluminum products with high recycled-content, at 800-866-2227, dependable@tubeliteinc.com
* Viracon, the leading fabricator of coated, high-performance architectural glass for global markets, at 800-533-2080, glass@viracon.com
* Wausau Window and Wall Systems, an industry leader in engineering window and curtainwall systems, at 877-678-2983, info@wausauwindow.com

Harmon, Inc.; Tubelite Inc.; Viracon, Inc.; and Wausau Window and Wall Systems, Inc. are part of Apogee Enterprises, Inc., a publicly held, U.S. corporation.
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07.05.10 Client News

University of Illinois Business Instructional Facility responds to students, achieves LEED Platinum certification

Balancing functionality, aesthetics and green goals, the Business Instructional Facility at the University of Illinois College of Business not only meets students’ needs for classroom, group collaboration, study and gathering space, it also incorporates industry-leading sustainability measures that students lobbied for at the outset of the building’s design. The University’s eye to the environment earned it the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Platinum certification – the first awarded to a College of Business at a public university and only the 15th such certification in the state of Illinois.

College of Business at Illinois

College of Business at Illinois

“It was no mistake the College of Business took action to build the first ‘green’ building on our campus,” said Larry DeBrock, the dean of the College of Business. “The LEED Platinum designation reflects the importance of social and professional responsibility to our students, staff, faculty, friends and alumni. We are proud of our continuing efforts to push the college and the campus to be leaders in a sustainable world for everyone.”

The Business Instructional Facility houses state-of-the-art classrooms, offices and a 300-seat auditorium, and, as the building’s centerpiece, a natural-light-filled atrium, where students meet and study, and the University hosts special events. The $60 million building’s energy-saving features, reduce energy use by an estimated 50 percent and utility costs by up to $300,000 per year.
These include:
* Solar panels to help power the building
* Roof plantings to insulate the building and reduce water runoff
* Filtered, humidity-controlled, low-velocity air delivered at ambient temperatures to improve indoor air quality year-round
* Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ 7250 Series SuperWall and 8750 Series structural-glazed curtainwall to maximize natural light in the four-story atrium
* Triple-glazed, operable windows in the classrooms and offices

“Basic passive integrations of smart building, shaping, siting and carefully tuning conventional wall systems — especially the windows — by the design team contributed more toward the sustainability and LEED Platinum certification than any high-tech element,” says Craig Copeland, Senior Associate at Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, and the project’s design team leader. “The variety of glazing systems is a big contributor to the building’s overall quality and environmental intelligence. There was a great deal of consideration given not only to thermal efficiency, but also to daylighting and ventilation for enhancing the building’s learning environment.”

Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, founded by University of Illinois alumnus Cesar Pelli, designed the four-story building, which opened in August 2008, and PSA Dewberry was the architect of record. Atelier Ten counseled the project and design team on massing, daylighting, thermal zoning and mechanical system types. Construction was managed by Gilbane Building Company, which oversaw 14 different contractors on the project. Among these was glazing contractor Bacon & Van Buskirk, which installed more than 13,000 square feet of curtainwall and 400 offset windows provided by Wausau for the project.

“The program statement specified our need for high-performing windows that provided outside views and as much natural light as possible. The atrium curtainwall takes full advantage of the southern exposure and available daylighting,” says George Freeman, director of facilities, for the College of Business. “It has become the place for everyone to gather in part because of the openness and light. Everybody loves that space.”

College of Business at Illinois

College of Business at Illinois

The atrium displays nearly 12,000 square feet of Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ 8750 Series structural-glazed four-side curtainwall and 1,000 square feet of 7250 Series SuperWall. In the classroom and offices, the Business Instructional Facility has 477 high-performance 4250 Series offset windows, part of the Advantage by Wausau standard product offering. The windows’ setback glass and asymmetrical sash sizes provide a distinctive look. For exceptional energy efficiency, three-quarters of these operable windows feature triple-glazed, insulated glass by Viracon.

According to Copeland, less than 25 percent of the total building is glazed, which may be deceiving because of the amount of bright and well-controlled, day-lit spaces throughout. In the auditorium, for example, less than 10 percent of the room’s walls are glazed. Windows placed horizontally at eye-level give students and faculty views to the outside and the perception of abundant natural light on sun-filled days.

More than half of the windows include integral, between-glass blinds. The blinds were reversed, such that the slats were concave in the “up” position. This allowed the occupants to not only manage privacy and light, but to have greater control in redirecting sunlight by bouncing the light off the blinds’ concave surface.

Demonstrating its commitment to durable, high-performance products, Wausau’s 4250 Series window units are NFRC-labeled and successfully tested to meet the AAMA AW-70 Performance Class rating. All of Wausau windows and curtainwall have aluminum frames, which can be specified with recycled content. For the University of Illinois College of Business, Wausau’s aluminum framing material was finished by Linetec in three-coat, 70 percent fluropolymer, Bone White paint for a consistent, long-lasting finish.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

06.30.10 Association News

AAMA Announces IG Certification Program, Offers Cost Savings for NFRC Certification Requirements

The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has joined forces with Associated Labs, Inc. (ALI) to offer insulating glass (IG) certification. The two organizations will work together to broaden accessibility to IG certification programs, just in time for the National Fenestration Rating Council’s (NFRC) imminent requirement for IG certification, effective July 1.

“The success of the largest North American whole product certification program combines with ALI’s well-established IG Certification Program. This relationship brings together two powerhouses of fenestration expertise – ALI with decades of IG certification experience and AAMA with decades of fenestration product certification and standards setting experience,” stated Rich Walker, AAMA president and CEO.

As of July 1, 2010, the NFRC will begin enforcing the requirement for IG certification by a listed, third-party certification program for all insulating glass units used in products that are authorized for NFRC certification and labeled in accordance with the NFRC 700, “Product Certification Program (PCP).”

“ALI offers competitive fees and a long history of IG certification,” says Walker. “ALI has been offering IG certification since 1968 and has been the sole administrator of AAMA’s air-water-structural certification program since 1984.”

He adds, “There will be immediate cost and scheduling savings for companies who currently participate in the AAMA air-water-structural certification program. Performing inspections for both the air-water-structural and IG programs offer significant cost savings.”

“AAMA brings to the table vast window and door experience, as well as marketing opportunities and accessibility to technology to increase the value of the licensee’s investment,” stated Brad Schultz, ALI’s Vice President.

An NFRC communication sent on June 22 states, “NFRC recommends that NFRC participating manufacturers contact one of the listed IGC Programs to obtain a copy of the IG Certification program requirements and discuss their options, ensuring that their insulating glass units are authorized for certification by the deadline date of July 1, 2010.”

In order to receive NFRC certification, manufacturers will be required to use certified insulating glass units from an approved, ANSI accredited certification agency, such as ALI. The listing of the IG certification program sponsors can be found on the NFRC website.

To ensure that your NFRC certification is compliant with the new IG certification requirement, contact Brad Schultz at ALI via e-mail or phone: 214-565-0593. More information about AAMA and its certification program offerings can be found on the Certification page.

A full news release is available online at AAMA’s online news room.

06.24.10 Association News

PMI Welcomes Fair Trade Committee Co-Chair

Mike Douglass

Mike Douglass

Plumbing Manufacturers Institute (PMI) President Lee Mercer of Moen Incorporated has made his selection for a new co-chair to help lead PMI’s Fair Trade Committee. Mike Douglass, manager of faucet engineering for Elkay Manufacturing Company, will serve alongside existing co-chair, Dale Gallmann, product compliance manager for Bradley Corporation.

While effective immediately, the three-year term for this position officially begins with the 2010 PMI Fall Meeting, being held in Washington, D.C., October 3-6 at the Liaison Capitol Hill.

Please see the full news release and portrait available at PMI’s online press room.

06.21.10 Client News

LAPD building demonstrates environmental leadership and community connection, while meeting seismic requirements

Considered the most expensive building of its kind, the $437 million Los Angeles Police Administration Building also is among the greenest, thanks in part to Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

©Tim Griffith

©Tim Griffith

In May 2010, the building earned Gold certification under the LEED® Green Building Rating System™ for new construction. The LAPD Headquarters project also was recognized in 2009 with the American Institute of Architects’ presidential honor award for “Building Team of the Year” and in June 2010 with the “Q Award” from the Alliance for Quality Construction.

Opened in October 2009, the 10-story, 500,000-square-foot structure maximizes the advantages daylighting and energy-efficiency. Aiding in this effort, the building features high-performance glass, recycled/recyclable aluminum framing and ornamental details, and environmentally friendly, durable paints.

Contributing to the building’s intended longevity, the window and curtainwall systems also were tested to meet stringent performance criteria. Seismic performance was of particular concern as the previous police administration building, constructed 1955, and was not expected to withstand another moderate earthquake.

One block south of its prior location, the new facility sits on the lot formerly occupied by the Caltrans building. The new police headquarters’ modern glass-metal-concrete exterior blends with the neighboring architectural icons including the new Caltrans building, City Hall, the Los Angeles Times building and St. Vibiana’s Cathedral.

Los Angeles-based AECOM (formerly DMJM Design) designed the Los Angeles Police Administration Building in joint venture with Roth + Sheppard of Denver. Tutor-Saliba Corporation of Sylmar, Calif., served as the project’s general contractor throughout the three years of construction. According to Tutor-Saliba’s James Nies, Wausau’s participation in this challenging project included “implementing a value-engineered system that saved the City significant amount of money. Achieving this required thorough submittal coordination, as well as installation tolerances with the adjacent, pre-cast concrete wall system.”

Geometric shapes, highly transparent glass and windows were incorporated throughout the building’s exterior to invite natural light and sightlines that connect the city’s law enforcement with the community it serves. Light colors and finishes are used to further communicate this sense of warmth and openness.

Many watching the project’s progress noted the visible transformation from structural framework to physical building began last summer as the first glass lites were installed. Specialty glazing contractor Metz Enterprises, Inc. of Anaheim, Calif., carefully and quickly installed the large windows and curtainwall units supplied by its manufacturer of choice, Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

Helping save time and labor in the field, the majority of the 100,000-square-feet of windows and curtainwall systems were shop-glazed and pre-assembled into ready-to-install units, then staged, sequenced, crated and shipped to the job site. To ensure proper performance protected by an up to 10-year warranty, these units were factory-glazed in Wausau’s climate-controlled, LEED-Silver certified manufacturing facility.

“Performance is critical,” emphasizes Wausau’s senior project manager, Kurt Beidle, who was involved from the earliest stages of the Los Angeles Police Administration Building’s development. “The project was tested for air, water, structural, floor displacement and seismic movement with repeated air and water tests between each requirement. This included both static and dynamic water tests on the windows, and on the unitized curtainwall. A full, two-story mock-up of the curtainwall, including the pre-cast, was assembled to match the descriptions and conditions, and successfully tested.”

Beidle also notes, “The unitized curtainwall had a simulated acid etch, as well as two different dot patterns. Viracon provided VRE1-67 and VE1-2M high-performance, insulated glass. The glass was silk-screened with a custom dot pattern that varied by elevation. Some locations had white dots; some black dots. It depended on the solar and optical needs of its placement on the building.”

Along with the custom silk-screened glass, the curtainwalls’ deep sightlines and shadow boxes add visual interest to the façade. Similarly, the window pattern avoids a grid-like layout in favor of an open, yet secure, staggered arrangement. For these 429 ‘punched’ openings, Wausau supplied factory-glazed, custom windows. “These were specifically designed for this project with a very thin metal profile along the side of the pre-cast opening. Each opening consisted of a pre-glazed, two-section window with the upper portion of the window in front of a pre-cast panel to accommodate quick, safe installation from the building’s interior,” explains Beidle.

For the street-level installation, Wausau fabricated a custom, butt-glazed, knocked-down wall system to enclose the café and auditorium. Beidle adds. “We also supplied the aluminum canopies for the entrances, as well as the decorative trim at the roof coping, and the vertical ‘knife point’ of the building. We also worked closely with the architectural staff to design custom interior trim, as well as custom exterior caps for the aesthetic look they were seeking.”

Supporting the project’s architectural goals for appearance and performance, the aluminum framing and components were painted by Linetec in a three-coat, Champagne Gold II metallic Duranar® coating, which meets or exceeds all criteria of the AAMA 2605 specification. “These are the most weather-resistant of all finishes,” says Jon Close, Linetec’s vice president of sales and marketing. “The three-coat process includes primer, topcoat and clear finish. This combination provides outstanding resistance to humidity, color change, chalk, gloss shift and chemical cleaning.”

Linetec’s environmentally responsible, liquid paint application also supports many projects’ green building goals. During the finishing process, Linetec captures and destroys the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) present in solvent-borne paints.

©Tim Griffith

©Tim Griffith

Within its finished interior, the Los Angeles Police Administration Building has dedicated spaces for administration and investigative operations, a Police Commission hearing room, conference center, state-of-the-art communications and command center, 200-seat café, and a 450-seat auditorium. Many of the building’s large assembly areas are used for civic and community functions as are its outdoor plazas and gardens.

The building was turned over to the owner, City of Los Angeles’ Department of Public Works, on time and under budget in September 2009. Eager to relocate, the 2,300 law enforcement officers and employees immediately began moving into the much-needed space and comfort of their new home.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.