06.12.10 Client News

Kolbe participates in the DOE’s Volume Purchase Program, promotes energy-efficient R-5 windows

Kolbe is an inaugural participant of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Volume Purchase Program (VPP) promoting energy-efficient R-5 windows. Windows with an R-5 value (or a U-factor of 0.2) represent the industry’s top tier of energy-efficient windows. The VPP allows window companies that have qualifying products to promote products through the designated website.

Builders visiting the DOE’s VPP website may select a size range with its associated cost range. After the size is chosen, a list of links to qualified manufacturers will appear. At this time, when users may click on Kolbe and the link will take them to the Kolbe website’s “where to buy” section. Entering a zip code enables visitors to receive contact information for distributors in their region.

The Kolbe Windquest® EP Series are among the products available on the DOE’s VPP website. These low-maintenance, long-lasting casement and studio windows exceed 2010 ENERGY STAR® criteria for all U.S. climate zones. A 1-1/4-inch, triple-glazed system helps these products achieve the required energy performance ratings needed to be part of the VPP.

A full news release and other information are available in Kolbe’s online press room.

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06.08.10 Client News

Auraria Science Building blends beauty, technology to achieve LEED-Gold

Science and beauty don’t often intersect, but when they do, the results can be stunning, or joyous, or artful: all of which have been used to describe the recently opened Auraria Science Building. Contributing to the structure’s praise-worthy façade design, glazing contractor J.R. Butler and Wausau Window and Wall Systems supported the building’s energy-efficient performance and Gold-level requirements of the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Green Rating System™.

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

The newest addition to Denver’s Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC), the $120 million Auraria Science Building opened in September 2009 as a premiere teaching facility for students from the Community College of Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver and the University of Colorado Denver. The existing Science Building was built in the early 1970s and is being renovated for an anticipated re-opening this autumn. Since the ’70s when the original science building opened, the Auraria Campus has grown 250%. The renovated structure will be united with the newly-constructed building to accommodate students in all three institutions and multiple programs.

Positioned at the campus’ main entrance, the east side of the new, four-story, 197,000-square-foot Science Building faces one of the busiest roads leading in and out of downtown Denver. Rather than shut the public out, the building’s floor-to-ceiling windows invite passers-by to peek inside. The views provided by the glass façade are intentional. In addition to serving as a highly rated educational facility, campus administrators also wanted the building to serve as a gateway, physically and visually connecting the Auraria campus to the greater Denver community.

In an interview with the Denver Post, the Science Building’s principal architect, David Pfeifer of AndersonMasonDale, said transparency was an important to the building’s design and function: “It is unmistakable that high-tech science education and research is occurring in the heart of the city.”

Views and light play an important part in setting the building’s transparent look and feel. From the east, those walking and driving by see into the building’s interior with walls painted in vivid shades of oranges, greens and blues. The building’s exposed vents, pipes and ductwork enhance its modern feel. Those inside the building enjoy abundant natural light, maximized by soffits that pull the interior walls away from the window system.

On the other sides of the building’s unique “7”-shaped design, the generous use of glass offer students and staff an unobstructed view of green spaces and other campus buildings. A shared lobby, hallways and other public access points connect the new building to the campus’ older, three-story science building.

Auraria - Sincere/Duncan Studios

Auraria - Sincere/Duncan Studios

Working with general contractor Haselden | Barton Malow, glazing contractor J.R. Butler selected Wausau as its supplier for the high-performance curtainwall and window systems. “Wausau was able to provide a complete package with its SuperWall for the new building and storefront and ribbon wall for the renovation project. The new construction portion used approximately 45,000 square feet of Wausau’s systems and Viracon’s glass,” says Marc Butler, president of J.R. Butler.  “We also used Lean manufacturing and scheduling, which turned out to be an important aspect in meeting the general contractor’s schedule.”

He explains, “Material management and installation requires careful coordination, especially when working in the field during the dead of winter. We rely on a just-in-time delivery to keep pace with the quick construction schedules. When schedules change, it can be difficult to make adjustments.”

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

J.R. Butler - Alpine Light Pictures Inc.

Working with the Lean principals and tools, with which both Wausau and Viracon are familiar, J.R. Butler was able to shift its attention from the building’s south elevation to the north elevation. “This meant that we could close-in the building’s northwest exposure, protecting it from the majority of winter storms. The general contractor was thrilled that we could accommodate their request and stick to the same, overall timeframe.”

Kevin Robbins, Wausau’s regional sales manager, was confident that Wausau’s products could exceed the project’s rigorous specifications, as well as meet J.R. Butler’s fast-paced schedule. “Thanks to the efficiencies of our Advantage by Wausau offering, we were able to provide the SuperWall system in just three weeks,” says Robbins. “In the past, a system like this could easily take eight to 10 weeks. Cutting the lead-time that dramatically opens up all kinds of opportunities. For Butler, this allowed their glazing team to unitize the system in their shop and quickly install the pre-assembled units on site.”

In addition to meeting the project’s construction timeline and aesthetic needs, Wausau’s SuperWall system’s high-performance glazing and thermal barrier framing systems contribute toward energy efficiency. Wausau’s 7250 Series system was specified with Viracon‘s VNE 1-63, neutral low-e glass “Given the project’s green goals, this was an important factor in the Science Building’s material selection,” notes Robbins.

The insulating, thermal barrier system was applied by Linetec, as was the aluminum framing’s finish. “The architect choose a custom, Extra Dark Bronze anodize, which is a hard finish to match,” says Butler. “Because Linetec finished all of the SuperWall, storefront and ribbon wall systems, we knew that we’d have a consistent look from one framing member to the next, and across both the new and renovated buildings.”

Linetec’s eco-friendly anodize also contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Using low-VOC paints and materials, assisted in achieving the LEED criteria. Some of Auraria Science Building’s other LEED credit-worthy, features include:
* Manufacturing materials regionally, 20% of which were produced within 500 miles
* Diverting 75% of construction waste from landfills
* Maintaining good air-quality measures during construction
* Installing energy-saving, occupancy sensors for interior lighting

Technology is found throughout the building, which houses everything from a cadaver lab and research spaces to a student lounge and coffee bar. The Science Building’s lab rooms are equipped with state-of-the-art classroom technology including laptop projectors and lectern cabinets with cameras, built-in laptop connections, Internet ports and other features.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

Wausau will be exhibiting at AIA Expo2010 in booth #2553.

06.07.10 Association News

AAMA Launches Newly Redesigned Website Showcasing Updated Content and Improved Ease of Navigation

The newly redesigned American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) website was launched today, and is accessible at www.aamanet.org. The association states that a main objective in redesigning the website was increasing ease of navigation to ensure that users can effortlessly take advantage of the vast information AAMA has to offer.

“Updating the AAMA website was a priority initiative, as we think it’s vitally important for our members to have quick and easy access to necessary information that is useful for their business and customers,” stated Rich Walker, AAMA president and CEO. “Additionally, the website was designed to be a resource for other groups, such as homeowners, contractors, and those seeking information on fenestration products or the building products industry.”

According to Angela Dickson, AAMA marketing manager, the site menu navigation has been improved to include menu items for products, materials, codes and resources. New “hot buttons” on the home page, as well as on all pages throughout the site, direct users to the AAMA Publication Store, the AAMA Certified Products Directory and other frequently-accessed pages within the site. The overall design scheme of the website has also been updated, and each audience segment has a distinct branding and color scheme in order to easily differentiate between sections.

“In addition to improving ease of use, website content is customized for the various audience segments who will be visiting the site,” stated Dickson. “The informational needs of an AAMA member company differ from those of a homeowner seeking information on window selection and media representatives searching for news stories. Tailoring content to each individual audience segment ensures that all site users can easily locate information most relevant to their needs.”

Featured news stories will now appear on the AAMA home page, as well as tailored news content for each audience segment. Industry and AAMA news stories, as well as notifications of updates to the site, are available through RSS feeds.

In conjunction with the overall website redesign, changes have also been made to the AAMA e-News, the association’s monthly e-newsletter which contains news items related to AAMA and the work of AAMA task groups, committees and councils. View the newly updated site at www.aamanet.org.
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06.02.10 Client News

Wausau will be exhibiting at AIA Expo2010 in booth #2553

More than 20 Wausau products labeled by NFRC

Nearly all of Wausau Window and Wall Systems‘ standard window products are listed in the National Fenestration Ratings Council (NFRC) Certified Products Directory. NFRC thermal performance labels are available for each of these architectural-class products, including seven operable and fixed window types, sliding glass doors and unitized curtainwall.

Wausau’s NFRC-labeled window products are included in the Advantage by Wausau line of competitively priced, high-performance, standard products. Advantage by Wausau meets the energy-efficiency concerns and fast pace of construction timelines for buildings such as schools and universities, hospitals and health care facilities, justice centers and government offices.

With consideration to building projects’ performance, NFRC labels are based on overall unit U-Factor and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC). These performance parameters are key to energy efficiency and proper product selection. Wausau’s 2250i-XLT fixed windows exhibit a U-Factor of 0.21 and its 6250i-HRX curtainwall system exhibits a U-Factor of 0.20 when glazed with spectrally-selective low-e glass. In addition to NFRC-labeled products, Wausau design engineers were among the first manufacturers certified as Approved Calculation Entities (ACEs) for NFRC’s new Component Modeling Approach, addressing curtainwall and window wall for commercial applications.

“NFRC is continually fine-tuning their labeling and certification processes for the

©Architectural Testing, Inc.

©Architectural Testing, Inc.

unique characteristics of the non-residential business. Energy-related performance parameters such as air infiltration, condensation resistance and durability are being incorporated,” says Tom Mifflin, Wausau’s government market manager and NFRC ACE. “U-Factor will continue to be one of the important performance parameters in window and curtainwall design, but must be considered in the context of test size, configuration, and applicability.”

Mifflin continues, “In spite of the attention given to U-Factor, commercial buildings are usually cooling-mode dominated, even in cool climates, so SHGC is of primary importance. Also, it’s inappropriate to apply the requirements of the residential ENERGY STAR® for Windows program to these commercial properties. Model Energy codes like ASHRAE 90.1 and IECC [International Energy Conservation Code] reflect best practices for non-residential applications. Besides NFRC labeling, in most jurisdictions, other compliance options include prescriptive design requirements, total building energy modeling, and various trade-off methodologies.”

Download a PDF of the full news release by clicking here.

06.01.10 Client News

Wausau will be exhibiting at AIA Expo2010 in booth #2553

Wausau presents new AIA/CES program:
“Window Selection for Sustainability and Long-Term Performance”

“Window Selection for Sustainability and Long-Term Performance” is a new, educational presentation available through Wausau Window and Wall Systems. As a registered American Institute of Architects’ Continuing Education System (AIA/CES) provider, Wausau’s AIA-approved program addresses fenestration in commercial and institutional building designs, such as government offices, health care facilities, schools and universities.

Those who attend and successfully complete the one-hour course will learn how to:
* Distinguish between fenestration types
* Establish appropriate window selection criteria
* Use industry standards to define windows’ performance levels, such as energy efficiency
* Compare fenestration products
* Understand the impact of the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Green Building Rating System™ on window selection

To record their new knowledge, participants will receive a Learning Unit credit for Health/Safety/Welfare and Sustainable Design, 1.0 LU/HSW/SD. AIA-registered architects are required to earn a total of 18 LUs in a calendar year. Of these, eight must be in Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW) subjects. Sustainable Design (SD) is a subset of HSW. Four of the eight HSW LUs must meet the established SD guidelines for mandatory continuing education. For additional information, please visit http://www.aia.org/education/index.htm.

“Beyond these educational presentations, Wausau’s long-standing commitment to architects, and to the whole building team, includes providing consultations, pre-bid design engineering assistance, and 24/7 access to product details, technical specifications and sustainable design information,” says Steve Gille, Wausau’s education market manager.

Other AIA/CES programs offered by Wausau include:
* Curtainwalls: Products, Performance and Practicalities (1.0 LU/HSW)
* Daylighting and Integrated Façade Design (1.0 LU/HSW/SD)
* Understanding U-Factors (1.0 LU/HSW/SD)
* Designing Fenestration for Blast Hazard Mitigation (1.0 LU/HSW)
* Glass: The Right Choice (1.0 LU/HSW)

For architectural firms seeking customized educational content, Wausau technical sales presenters have covered such topics as:
* Codes and Standards
* The USGBC LEED® Rating System™
* Unitized Curtainwall Design
* Patient Safety in Health Care Construction
* Façade-Integrated Photovoltaics

To request a presentation or other educational information from Wausau Window and Wall Systems, please e-mail info@wausauwindow.com.

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05.28.10 Client News

Cyndy Workman-Snow named as Wausau’s representative serving New Mexico, Utah and Colorado

Wausau Window and Wall Systems named Cyndy Workman-Snow as its architectural sales representative in New Mexico, Utah and Colorado. Workman-Snow supports architects and design teams, general and specialty contractors, as well as owners and developers of commercial building projects.

Based in Denver, Workman-Snow says, “At this time, we see many opportunities in the region to provide high-performance window and curtainwall systems for health care, government and institutional construction, as well as renovation projects. Energy-performance and other green building goals are especially important to those who design, construct and manage these facilities and to the local communities who use them.”

Demonstrating her commitment to environmentally-responsible design and building, Workman-Snow belongs to the U.S. Green Building Council and is pursuing LEED accreditation. She recently joined the Construction Specifications Institute. Locally, she has served as a long-time member of the Colorado Glazing Contractors Association.

Prior to her new role with Wausau, Workman-Snow served as a senior sales representative for glazing contractor Harmon, Inc.‘s Denver office. During her five years at Harmon, she was involved with several projects featuring Wausau’s systems including window renovations for student residence towers at the University of Denver.

Workman-Snow studied at the University of Houston‘s College of Architecture, but says that she “was born into the glazing industry” through her father’s curtainwall consultancy in Houston, Texas. She went on to work for Shelton Greer in Houston. In the 1980s, Workman-Snow moved to Colorado and took a drafting position with RPS, followed by a similar position with Elward Construction, and later, A-1 Glass, Inc.

Download a PDF of the full news release by clicking here.

05.24.10 Client News

Graham Construction Services begins Central Corridor Light Rail Transit Advanced Traffic Improvements Project

One of several transit projects for the company

Graham Construction Services, Inc. is working on several transit projects that will transform Minnesota’s commuter landscape. These include Graham’s activities on the Central Corridor Light Rail Transit (CCLRT) Advanced Traffic Improvements project and on the 4th Street Advanced Utility Construction project. In addition, the company has completed the Hiawatha Light Rail Transit line extension to Target Field.

Central Corridor Light Rail Transit Advanced Traffic Improvements Project, Minneapolis
This month, Graham began work on the recently-awarded CCLRT Advanced Traffic Improvements project. This early-stage portion of the Metropolitan Council project is valued at $4 million and encompasses the East Bank area of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus.

Graham will prepare the roadways that will carry additional traffic during the CCLRT construction. The company’s involvement also will include underground utilities, traffic control equipment and interconnections, bituminous roadway pavement, curb and gutter work, demolition and rebuilding of retaining walls, earthwork and landscaping.

This phase of the project is expected to be completed in August 2010. Service on the 11-mile Central Corridor is anticipated to begin in 2014. When it opens, the CCLRT project will link downtown St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis along Washington and University Avenues via the state Capitol and University of Minnesota. The line will connect with the Hiawatha LRT line at the Metrodome station in Minneapolis and the Northstar commuter rail line at the new Target Field Station.

The Metropolitan Council is charged with building the line in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Transportation. The Central Corridor Management Committee, which includes the mayors of St. Paul and Minneapolis, commissioners from Ramsey and Hennepin counties and the University of Minnesota, provides advice and oversight. The project’s leaders estimated 800 direct construction and management jobs will be provided annually during the CCLRT construction. For details, please see www.centralcorridor.org.

4th Street Advanced Utility Construction Project, St. Paul
Graham is providing construction services for another of the Metropolitan Council’s CCLRT projects. As part of the 4th Street Advanced Utility Construction project team, Graham is helping relocate underground utilities — such as sanitary and storm sewer, hot and chilled water lines, and water main — from beneath the footprint of a new CCLRT track in downtown St. Paul. Graham also is preparing the project’s foundation for the rail’s overhead catenary system.

Work on the project began in September 2009 and is scheduled for completion in November 2010. Bolander Construction is the general contractor for the project and is responsible for the full, finished project and for managing a total, estimated budget of $12.5 million.

Hiawatha Light Rail Transit Line Extension Project, Minneapolis
Among Graham’s transit project experience, the company recently completed the Hiawatha Light Rail Transit (LRT) extension. With a contract value of $29 million, this project connects the LRT with the new Northstar Corridor commuter rail line.

Graham’s efforts included the construction of the new Downtown Intermodal Commuter Rail Station, construction of six steel and glass station buildings located along the rail line, and a 6,300-linear-foot track system. One of the platform stations now serves the new Minnesota Twins Ballpark, Target Field.

As general contractor on the project, Graham’s work also included reconstructing two bridges to support the LRT: The 5th Street bridges over I-394 and the BNSF railroad bridge, which were completed without vehicular or rail traffic interruption. The demolition and reconstruction work was accomplished while maintaining traffic on I-394 and without interruption to BNSF rail traffic.
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For more photos, please see the Metropolitan Council’s “Central Corridor LRT’s photostream” on Flickr.