06.30.10 Association News

AAMA Announces IG Certification Program, Offers Cost Savings for NFRC Certification Requirements

The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has joined forces with Associated Labs, Inc. (ALI) to offer insulating glass (IG) certification. The two organizations will work together to broaden accessibility to IG certification programs, just in time for the National Fenestration Rating Council’s (NFRC) imminent requirement for IG certification, effective July 1.

“The success of the largest North American whole product certification program combines with ALI’s well-established IG Certification Program. This relationship brings together two powerhouses of fenestration expertise – ALI with decades of IG certification experience and AAMA with decades of fenestration product certification and standards setting experience,” stated Rich Walker, AAMA president and CEO.

As of July 1, 2010, the NFRC will begin enforcing the requirement for IG certification by a listed, third-party certification program for all insulating glass units used in products that are authorized for NFRC certification and labeled in accordance with the NFRC 700, “Product Certification Program (PCP).”

“ALI offers competitive fees and a long history of IG certification,” says Walker. “ALI has been offering IG certification since 1968 and has been the sole administrator of AAMA’s air-water-structural certification program since 1984.”

He adds, “There will be immediate cost and scheduling savings for companies who currently participate in the AAMA air-water-structural certification program. Performing inspections for both the air-water-structural and IG programs offer significant cost savings.”

“AAMA brings to the table vast window and door experience, as well as marketing opportunities and accessibility to technology to increase the value of the licensee’s investment,” stated Brad Schultz, ALI’s Vice President.

An NFRC communication sent on June 22 states, “NFRC recommends that NFRC participating manufacturers contact one of the listed IGC Programs to obtain a copy of the IG Certification program requirements and discuss their options, ensuring that their insulating glass units are authorized for certification by the deadline date of July 1, 2010.”

In order to receive NFRC certification, manufacturers will be required to use certified insulating glass units from an approved, ANSI accredited certification agency, such as ALI. The listing of the IG certification program sponsors can be found on the NFRC website.

To ensure that your NFRC certification is compliant with the new IG certification requirement, contact Brad Schultz at ALI via e-mail or phone: 214-565-0593. More information about AAMA and its certification program offerings can be found on the Certification page.

A full news release is available online at AAMA’s online news room.

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06.29.10 Client News

Appleton Coated challenges designers to a throwdown on U2 – “The Battle of the Finishes”
Must-have reference tool for successful paper selection

Much like adding an extra flourish to a food presentation, Appleton Coated’s “U2 Throwdown – Battle of the Finishes” demonstrates the attributes that make each finish ideal for certain types of imagery and printing applications. Showcasing the best finish for the job, Utopia Two (U2) and U2:XG Gloss, Dull, Matte, and new U2:XG Ivory Matte are featured along with the other finishes in a head-to-head comparison. In addition, a demonstration of how gloss and dull varnish, and gloss and satin aqueous coating, further affects the print outcome is included.

Encouraging audience participation, “U2 Throwdown – Battle of the Finishes” features customer “throwdowns” on the most delicious cupcakes, pizzas, and other culinary goodness throughout the country. Submissions are welcome!

06.24.10 Association News

PMI Welcomes Fair Trade Committee Co-Chair

Mike Douglass

Mike Douglass

Plumbing Manufacturers Institute (PMI) President Lee Mercer of Moen Incorporated has made his selection for a new co-chair to help lead PMI’s Fair Trade Committee. Mike Douglass, manager of faucet engineering for Elkay Manufacturing Company, will serve alongside existing co-chair, Dale Gallmann, product compliance manager for Bradley Corporation.

While effective immediately, the three-year term for this position officially begins with the 2010 PMI Fall Meeting, being held in Washington, D.C., October 3-6 at the Liaison Capitol Hill.

Please see the full news release and portrait available at PMI’s online press room.

06.22.10 Client News

Kolbe’s Lance Premeau certified as LEED Green Associate

Lance Premeau, Kolbe‘s product and market analyst, successfully passed the U.S. Green Building Council‘s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design® (LEED) Green Associate Certification. The achievement is part of the company’s ongoing initiative to support and educate customers’ green design and building projects.

Professional certification for LEED unites leaders from across the building industry who promote buildings that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live and work. Introduced in 2009, the new LEED Green Associate credential demonstrates comprehensive, general knowledge in green building and LEED. It distinguishes individuals that support, but may not directly apply, green building in their regular professional work. This credential also is a prerequisite to pursue the next tier of accreditation, LEED Professional with Specialty.

Premeau adds his status as a LEED Green Associate to his 18 years of experience in contributing to commercial and residential applications. In his daily work, Premeau is involved with Kolbe’s green strategies through printed materials, online content, training seminars, market and industry research, as well as presentations.

As an example, Premeau helps architects gain sustainable design knowledge and learning units through American Institute of Architects’ continuing education seminars (AIA/CES). Kolbe most recently began offering “Sustainable and Energy Efficient Windows & Doors: Contribution to Green Buildings,” a one-hour, in-person AIA/CES course.

A full news release and portrait are available in Kolbe’s online press room.

06.21.10 Client News

LAPD building demonstrates environmental leadership and community connection, while meeting seismic requirements

Considered the most expensive building of its kind, the $437 million Los Angeles Police Administration Building also is among the greenest, thanks in part to Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

©Tim Griffith

©Tim Griffith

In May 2010, the building earned Gold certification under the LEED® Green Building Rating System™ for new construction. The LAPD Headquarters project also was recognized in 2009 with the American Institute of Architects’ presidential honor award for “Building Team of the Year” and in June 2010 with the “Q Award” from the Alliance for Quality Construction.

Opened in October 2009, the 10-story, 500,000-square-foot structure maximizes the advantages daylighting and energy-efficiency. Aiding in this effort, the building features high-performance glass, recycled/recyclable aluminum framing and ornamental details, and environmentally friendly, durable paints.

Contributing to the building’s intended longevity, the window and curtainwall systems also were tested to meet stringent performance criteria. Seismic performance was of particular concern as the previous police administration building, constructed 1955, and was not expected to withstand another moderate earthquake.

One block south of its prior location, the new facility sits on the lot formerly occupied by the Caltrans building. The new police headquarters’ modern glass-metal-concrete exterior blends with the neighboring architectural icons including the new Caltrans building, City Hall, the Los Angeles Times building and St. Vibiana’s Cathedral.

Los Angeles-based AECOM (formerly DMJM Design) designed the Los Angeles Police Administration Building in joint venture with Roth + Sheppard of Denver. Tutor-Saliba Corporation of Sylmar, Calif., served as the project’s general contractor throughout the three years of construction. According to Tutor-Saliba’s James Nies, Wausau’s participation in this challenging project included “implementing a value-engineered system that saved the City significant amount of money. Achieving this required thorough submittal coordination, as well as installation tolerances with the adjacent, pre-cast concrete wall system.”

Geometric shapes, highly transparent glass and windows were incorporated throughout the building’s exterior to invite natural light and sightlines that connect the city’s law enforcement with the community it serves. Light colors and finishes are used to further communicate this sense of warmth and openness.

Many watching the project’s progress noted the visible transformation from structural framework to physical building began last summer as the first glass lites were installed. Specialty glazing contractor Metz Enterprises, Inc. of Anaheim, Calif., carefully and quickly installed the large windows and curtainwall units supplied by its manufacturer of choice, Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

Helping save time and labor in the field, the majority of the 100,000-square-feet of windows and curtainwall systems were shop-glazed and pre-assembled into ready-to-install units, then staged, sequenced, crated and shipped to the job site. To ensure proper performance protected by an up to 10-year warranty, these units were factory-glazed in Wausau’s climate-controlled, LEED-Silver certified manufacturing facility.

“Performance is critical,” emphasizes Wausau’s senior project manager, Kurt Beidle, who was involved from the earliest stages of the Los Angeles Police Administration Building’s development. “The project was tested for air, water, structural, floor displacement and seismic movement with repeated air and water tests between each requirement. This included both static and dynamic water tests on the windows, and on the unitized curtainwall. A full, two-story mock-up of the curtainwall, including the pre-cast, was assembled to match the descriptions and conditions, and successfully tested.”

Beidle also notes, “The unitized curtainwall had a simulated acid etch, as well as two different dot patterns. Viracon provided VRE1-67 and VE1-2M high-performance, insulated glass. The glass was silk-screened with a custom dot pattern that varied by elevation. Some locations had white dots; some black dots. It depended on the solar and optical needs of its placement on the building.”

Along with the custom silk-screened glass, the curtainwalls’ deep sightlines and shadow boxes add visual interest to the façade. Similarly, the window pattern avoids a grid-like layout in favor of an open, yet secure, staggered arrangement. For these 429 ‘punched’ openings, Wausau supplied factory-glazed, custom windows. “These were specifically designed for this project with a very thin metal profile along the side of the pre-cast opening. Each opening consisted of a pre-glazed, two-section window with the upper portion of the window in front of a pre-cast panel to accommodate quick, safe installation from the building’s interior,” explains Beidle.

For the street-level installation, Wausau fabricated a custom, butt-glazed, knocked-down wall system to enclose the café and auditorium. Beidle adds. “We also supplied the aluminum canopies for the entrances, as well as the decorative trim at the roof coping, and the vertical ‘knife point’ of the building. We also worked closely with the architectural staff to design custom interior trim, as well as custom exterior caps for the aesthetic look they were seeking.”

Supporting the project’s architectural goals for appearance and performance, the aluminum framing and components were painted by Linetec in a three-coat, Champagne Gold II metallic Duranar® coating, which meets or exceeds all criteria of the AAMA 2605 specification. “These are the most weather-resistant of all finishes,” says Jon Close, Linetec’s vice president of sales and marketing. “The three-coat process includes primer, topcoat and clear finish. This combination provides outstanding resistance to humidity, color change, chalk, gloss shift and chemical cleaning.”

Linetec’s environmentally responsible, liquid paint application also supports many projects’ green building goals. During the finishing process, Linetec captures and destroys the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) present in solvent-borne paints.

©Tim Griffith

©Tim Griffith

Within its finished interior, the Los Angeles Police Administration Building has dedicated spaces for administration and investigative operations, a Police Commission hearing room, conference center, state-of-the-art communications and command center, 200-seat café, and a 450-seat auditorium. Many of the building’s large assembly areas are used for civic and community functions as are its outdoor plazas and gardens.

The building was turned over to the owner, City of Los Angeles’ Department of Public Works, on time and under budget in September 2009. Eager to relocate, the 2,300 law enforcement officers and employees immediately began moving into the much-needed space and comfort of their new home.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

06.18.10 Client News

Saint Elizabeths’ new, mental health care facility designed with daylight, green spaces; replaces 155-year-old institution

In April, Saint Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D.C., welcomed patients and staff into a new, mental health care facility. Established in 1852, Saint Elizabeths was the first large-scale, federally-run hospital for people with mental illness. The move completes a transition from the historic, psychiatric institution into a modern, healing environment.

Designed by Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Architecture & Engineering, the new hospital is centered on recovery-based mental health treatment and the highest quality, patient care. The facility’s design incorporates numerous sustainable design elements such as a 28,000-square-foot green roof, the strategic use of garden spaces and natural light.

Contributing to these green goals, the building’s operation, the occupants’ outlook and the patients’ safety, Wausau Window and Wall Systems provided Saint Elizabeths’ new facility with 373 project-in, psychiatric-grade window units. Glazing contractor Clyde McHenry, Inc., worked closely with Wausau and with general contractor Tompkins Builders, Inc. to ensure all criteria were met.

Under the guidance of Gilbane Building Company, Tompkins Builders began construction in 2006 on the $140 million, 450,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility. In 2008, Clyde McHenry installed the psychiatric-grade windows throughout the building. “It was a massive project, but our portion went well. We do windows and we’ve done several jobs with Tompkins before this,” says Fred Peters, Clyde McHenry’s director of sales and project manager. “We got with Wausau and worked it out. We’d exchange the drawings, make sure we met the specs, then submitted it to the architect for approval.”

Helping earn this approval, Wausau’s time-tested psychiatric windows were furnished with interior polycarbonate glazing, human impact resistant to prevent unauthorized egress or passage of contraband. The design employed has been in successful use for more than 20 years, on scores of institutions nationwide. “If a patient strikes or throws an object against the window, energy must be transferred sequentially through hardware, window frames, anchorage and substrates,” explains Lisa May, Wausau’s health care market manager.

The windows units’ aluminum framing offer a durable, low-maintenance, Dark Bronze anodize, as finished by Linetec. Also helping minimize maintenance, Wausau’s 3250-DT Series windows were specified with 5/8-inch, between-glass blinds. The integral blinds reduce the potential dangers of exposed cords and slats. Concealed hinges and tamper-resistant locks secure the opening during normal operating conditions. In the event of an emergency, the operable windows allow rescue personnel to enter the building or to open a series of units for rapid fresh air circulation.

“While patient safety remains a primary consideration in psychiatric applications, facilities like Saint Elizabeths are creating a more home-like atmosphere with natural light and unrestricted views to the outside,” adds May.

Saint Elizabeths Hospital provides intensive, in-patient care for individuals with serious and persistent mental illness who need the security and structure to assist in their recovery. Saint Elizabeths also provides mental health evaluations and care to patients committed by the courts. The Hospital is part of the D.C. Department of Mental Health (DMH), which serves 17,000 adults, children and youth each year.

Saint Elizabeths Hospital’s original, 155-year old facility is located east of the Anacostia River. Its historic buildings date back to 1855 when it opened as the Government Hospital for the Insane. During the Civil War, the facility was converted temporarily into a hospital for wounded soldiers. In 1916, its name was officially changed to Saint Elizabeths. In 1991, the National Trust for Historic Preservation declared the site a National Historic Landmark. In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security broke ground on this notable campus to construct its consolidated headquarters.

The first of many structures erected on the campus was the Center Building, designed by Thomas U. Walter, architect of the Capitol. The building’s floor plan is one of the nation’s earliest relying on the therapeutic direction of Thomas S. Kirkbride, one of the founders of the American Psychiatric Association. Charles H. Nichols, the hospital’s first medical superintendent, enhanced Walter’s design and Kirkbride’s plan to emphasize patient observation, as well as ventilation and external views. These architectural characteristics remain essential elements of the new Saint Elizabeths Hospital.

Throughout its history, Saint Elizabeths is estimated to have served more than 125,000 patients. Well-known patients have included Ezra Pound and John Hinckley, Jr. Today, the new facility and its staff have the capacity to care for approximately 300 patients and to develop a personalized treatment plan helping each patient achieve the highest quality, mental health outcomes.

Download a PDF of the full success story by clicking here.

06.17.10 Client News

Steve Seeling joins Tubelite as client development manager

Tubelite Inc. has hired Steve Seeling, CDT, as a client development manager representing the company’s architectural aluminum products. In this role, he assists commercial building teams in Nebraska, Kansas, western Missouri and Arkansas.

Seeling draws from three decades of experience in helping owners, designers and installers select windows, entrances, storefronts and curtainwall systems. Most recently, he worked at Traco as an architectural sales representative with a similar territory. Throughout his career, he has contributed to dozens of educational health care, hospitality and historically-significant projects in the region, including facilities at the University of Kansas, University of Missouri, and the University of Nebraska.

In addition to his new position with Tubelite, he also serves as an architectural sales representative for Wausau Window and Wall Systems. “Tubelite and Wausau’s products complement each other to offer customers a full range of performance choices for their building envelope,” says Seeling. “Working exclusively with these two companies, I’ll specialize in premium fenestration products; ones that add value through energy efficiency, distinguished style and dependability. When customers understand their options, they can make better-informed decisions to ensure the correct product for their application.”

As an example, Seeling notes that Tubelite and Wausau’s products contribute to customers’ green goals such as the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Rating System™. All of Tubelite’s storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylight control systems are manufactured using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition featuring environmentally-friendly finishes. Many products also are available with high thermal performance to support buildings’ energy-efficient operations. “Along with the right products, Tubelite and Wausau provide educational programs to help architects increase their knowledge of the total, integrated façade,” says Seeling.

A graduate of Missouri Valley College in Marshall, Mo., Seeling earned a bachelor’s degree in economics. He continues his professional development with industry associations such as Construction Specifications Institute, through which he successfully completed the Construction Documents Technology (CDT) program.
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